January 28, 2011

Most Dangerous Threats

These are some of the most dangerous threats:
 
NIMDA:
Shortly after the September 11 tragedy this computer virus infected hundreds of thousands of computers worldwide. Nimda was considered to be one of the most complicated viruses, having up to 5 different methods of infecting computers systems and duplicating itself. It was started in 2001.

SAPPHIRE:
SQL Slammer, also known as Sapphire, was launched on January 25, 2003. It was a doozy of a worm that had a noticeable negative impact upon global Internet traffic. Its target was servers. The virus was a single-packet, 376-byte worm that generated random IP addresses and sent itself to those IP addresses. If the IP address was a computer running an unpatched copy of Microsoft’s SQL Server Desktop Engine, that computer would immediately begin firing the virus off to random IP addresses as well.

Slammer infected 75,000 computers in 10 minutes which is very remarkable. The outrageously high amounts of traffic overloaded routers across the globe, which created higher demands on other routers, which shut them down, and so on.

 BLASTER: 
The summer of 2003 was a rough time for businesses running PCs. In rapid succession, IT professionals witnessed the unleashing of both the Blaster and Sobig worms. Blaster, also known as Lovsan or MSBlast, was the first to hit. The virus was detected on August 11 and spread rapidly, peaking in just two days. Transmitted via network and Internet traffic, this worm exploited a vulnerability in Windows 2000 and Windows XP, and when activated, presented the PC user with a menacing dialog box indicating that a system shutdown was imminent.
Hidden in the code of MSBLAST.EXE — the virus’ executable ” were these messages: “I just want to say LOVE YOU SAN!!” and “billy gates why do you make this possible? Stop making money and fix your software!!”


SOBIG: 
The Sobig worm hit right at the end of Blaster, making August 2003 a miserable month for corporate and home PC users. The most destructive variant was Sobig.F, which spread so rapidly on August 19 that it set a record (which would later be broken by MyDoom), generating over 1 million copies of itself in its first 24 hours.
                   The virus infected host computers via innocuously named e-mail attachments such as application.pif and thank_you.pif. When activated, this worm transmitted itself to e-mail addresses discovered on a host of local file types. The end result was massive amounts of Internet traffic. On September 10, 2003, the virus deactivated itself and is no longer a threat. 

MyDoom

For a period of a few hours on January 26, 2004, the MyDoom shockwave could be felt around the world as this worm spread at an unprecedented rate across the Internet via e-mail. The worm, also known as Norvarg, spread itself in a particularly devious manner: It transmitted itself as an attachment in what appeared to be an e-mail error message containing the text “Mail Transaction Failed.” Clicking on the attachment spammed the worm to e-mail addresses found in address books. MyDoom also attempted to spread via the shared folders of users’ Kazaa peer-to-peer networking accounts.
The replication was so successful that computer security experts have speculated that one in every 10 e-mail messages sent during the first hours of infection contained the virus. MyDoom was programmed to stop spreading after February 12, 2004.

DOWNAD

The latest and most dangerous virus is the downadup worm, which was also called “Conficker”.  computer virus has infected 3.5 million computers worldwide. This malicious program was able to spread using a patched Windows flaw and Vulnerability. Downadup was successful in spreading across the Web due to the fact that it used a flaw that Microsoft patched in October in order to distantly compromise computers that ran unpatched versions of Microsoft’s operating system. But the greatest power of the worm is believed to be the ability of computers, infected with the worm, to download destructive code from a random drop point

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